New rules aim to reduce risk of rollover car accidents in Maine, elsewhere

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has announced new rules aimed at reducing the risk of serious or fatal injury as a result of rollover car accidents in Maine and elsewhere.

Our Portland personal injury lawyers understand the high risk of serious or fatal injury that typically results from rollover accidents. The risks of rollover accidents are a significant safety issues for all classes of vehicle. However, occupants of pickups, SUVs and vans face increased risk.
774605_car_accident_2.jpg
The U. . Department of Transportation reports there are more than 225,000 rollover crashes each year, resulting in about one-third of all passenger vehicle fatalities. About 9,000 motorists are killed and more than 200,000 are injured each year.

“Safety is our highest priority,” said U. . Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. “This new standard will help save lives and reduce injuries by requiring vehicles to have a safety system that keeps occupants in the vehicle in a rollover crash.”

The new rules will require vehicle manufacturers to develop countermeasures for passenger vehicles that prevent an unbelted adult from moving more than four inches past the side window in the event of a crash. The new standards will be begin being phased into new vehicles in 2013 and must be standard in all new models by 2018.

“Rollover crashes are the deadliest of all crash types and this is another important step in our efforts to reduce fatalities and serious injuries that result from them,” said Administrator David Strickland, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “When fully implemented, we believe this standard will prevent on average 373 fatalities and 476 serious injuries every year.”

If you have suffered a slip and fall accident on business property or are dealing with a premise liability issue, contact the Portland personal injury lawyers and wrongful death attorneys at Peter Thompson & Associates for a free consultation to discuss your rights. Call 1-800-804-2004.

Contact Information