Articles Tagged with Maine auto accident

Motorcyclists in Maine are at higher risk of injuries and death than occupants of other types of motor vehicles. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reports an estimated 88,000 motorcyclists are injured and nearly 5,000 killed each year in the U.S. Per vehicle mile traveled, motorcyclist fatalities occurred nearly 29 times more frequently than passenger car occupant deaths in crashes. This is part of the reason why Maine requires motorcyclists to carry insurance coverage. motorcycle accident

The state requires riders to carry a minimum of $50,000 for injury/death to any one person, $100,000 in bodily injury liability for a single Maine motorcycle accident resulting in the death or injury of more than one person, and $25,000 in property damage coverage. State law also mandates uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.

If an auto insurance policy is cancelled and not reinstated prior to a crash, obtaining coverage can prove difficult, if not impossible. One aspect our Maine injury lawyers would explore in that case is whether the insurer satisfied the statutory notice requirements as set forth in 24-A M.R.S. Section 2914(1).

Maine requires all drivers to purchase uninsured/ underinsured motorist (UM/UIM) coverage, and it often comes into play in many car accident lawsuits. The minimum limits of UM/UIM coverage are $50,000 per person and $100,000 per accident. Typically, it’s a good idea if you can afford it to purchase more than that, as a serious auto accident can result in damages that far exceed that amount. cardriving

Uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage can apply if you are:

  • Injured in a crash caused by a driver with no car insurance;
  • Injured as a pedestrian bicyclist or skateboarder struck by a vehicle;
  • Injured in a hit-and-run accident or in a situation where a “phantom vehicle” enters your lane and causes you to veer off the road;
  • Injured as a passenger in a motor vehicle;
  • Injured in a crash caused by a driver whose bodily injury liability limits are lower than the limits of your UIM coverage.

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A driver behind the wheel in a car crash that left one person dead and three seriously injured was reportedly traveling at nearly twice the speed limit, police say.speed2

Speeding, of course, is one of the most prevalent contributing factors in auto accidents, with the National Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reporting the average annual cost of speed-related crashes nationally is more than $40 billion.

Bangor Daily News staffers recently combed through law enforcement analysis of the May 14th crash in Belfast involving a 19-year-old driver and her four young passengers. Continue reading

A motorist in Orient, about two hours north of Bangor, crashed his vehicle as he attempted to take a “selfie” while driving. cellphone1

In so doing, he not only wrecked his car, he and two of his passengers were injured and had to be rushed to a local hospital. He had reportedly been with seven passengers total. In an attempt to immortalize the good time they were having, the man took out his camera phone, leaned in to be included in the shot – and then lost control of his car, slamming head-on into a tree.

That’s according to several media reports, which indicate the driver was not a teenager, but rather a 29-year-old man. The others in the vehicle were between the ages of 28 and 35. The two friends who were injured were seated in the front seat and were not wearing seat belts. Continue reading

A 9-year-old boy was killed, while his mother and 6-year-old brother were seriously injured, after a 63-year-old woman drove her sedan into a line of people waiting on a wharf in Rockland, Maine for a ferry ride to Monhegan. Also seriously injured in the crash was a 70-year-old man who suffered a shattered hip.wharf

Now, parents of the boy who lost his life have filed a  Maine wrongful death lawsuit against the New York City driver, as well as the owners of the ferry and the boat line business.

Plaintiffs allege the crash could have been prevented if the driver had not been operating her vehicle negligently or, alternatively, had the ferry line acted to erect gates and barriers or worked to safely channel bicycle, pedestrian and vehicle traffic on the wharf where the crash happened. Continue reading